(via fishingboatproceeds)

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tastefullyoffensive:

[sarahseeandersen]

tastefullyoffensive:

[sarahseeandersen]

(Source: sarahseeandersen)

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sourcedumal:

femmeanddangerous:

Self Care Bingo By missvoltairine

sourcedumal:

femmeanddangerous:

Self Care Bingo By missvoltairine

(via seananmcguire)

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(Source: kant-stop, via seananmcguire)

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When a classmate who really wants to work with adults starts their peds placement

whatshouldwecallslp:

                                     

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rissawesome:

agender-ara:

flagitiousbunny:

WHAT ARE BIRDS

Hello yes! A Science Birb, here to explain the science!

Birb have VERY LARGE EYE in skull. Very good for seeing! But not space for muscle, birb cannot move eye. For mammal to make steady image, keep focus on single thing, always moving eye! Tiny movements, sometimes not even know. But birb cannot make tiny movements! So, birb must move whole head. And that is why the birb can keep steady the head when the body is amovering!

Thank you for listening to a science

I’m crying

That was the greatest scientific explanation I have ever read

(Source: boyquail, via fatnutritionist)

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stand-up-comic-gifs:

And then I’d like to get my hands replaced with suction cups. (x)

(via annetdonahue)

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(Source: jaidefinichon, via yayasmeen)

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constructionpaperandtears:

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nubbsgalore:

Photos by Gerry Ellis from the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a nursery and orphanage for elephants in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park. Here, fifty five keepers are charged with being around the clock parents to an elephant. The elephants, however, are the ones who chose their caretakers; it is the keepers who must ingratiate themselves to the elephants and earn their trust.

When elephants first arrive at the orphanage they are often traumatized from having witnessed the slaughter of their mothers and family by poachers. Grieving can last several months, and they often lose the will to live. But as Dame Daphne Sheldrick, founder of the orphanage, explains, a caretaker is charged with “persuading an elephant to live when it wants to die.”

Approximately 35,000 elephants are killed by humans every year. With an estimated 350,000 elephants left in the whole continent of Africa, they will be gone in the wild within ten years.

CBC’s The Nature of Things did a program on the elephants and their caretakers. You can foster an elephant with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust online here. For more on the emotional lives of elephants, as well as the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and other human efforts to save them, check out these posts

Always reblog baby elephants!

(via thefrogman)

47,527 notes